According to NACFE, low rolling resistance tires are now on more than 80% of new truck and trailers. - Photo: Jim Park

According to NACFE, low rolling resistance tires are now on more than 80% of new truck and trailers.

Photo: Jim Park

The North American Council for Freight Efficiency has revised its Confidence Reports on low-rolling-resistance tires to reflect industry developments since they were published in 2015. The reports include both dual configuration and wide-base tires.

Low-rolling-resistance tires are now on more than 80% of new truck and trailers, according to NACFE. With Greenhouse Gas Phase 2 regulations now in effect and tires recognized as one of the technologies that help achieve the goals set forth in the regulation, manufacturers will encourage fleets to spec low-rolling-resistance tires even when fuel prices are low and to switch to even lower rolling resistance tires as they become available.

“Even though the upfront costs of low rolling resistance tires may be higher, the cost of the fuel that a tire consumes due to its rolling resistance is five times greater than the initial purchase price of the tire,” according to Mike Roeth, NACFE’s executive director.

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Higher fuel prices led to an increased interest in wide-base tires, but as dual tires with equivalent low rolling resistance were engineered, the interest in wide-base tires has decreased, according to the report. But fleets continue to be interested in low rolling resistance tires as a way to reduce operating costs.

The report provides fleets with best practices regarding low rolling resistance tires, noting that thorough maintenance is essential to get the best life and performance from these tires. In addition to the confidence matrix, which indicates the study team’s confidence in the investment case for low rolling resistance tires, the report also contains a decision guide and payback calculator.

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