With the launch of the battery-electric Model 220EV, Peterbilt is wading into what is sure to become a crowded marketplace and the Model 220EV fits right into the pickup and delivery segment.
 - Photo: Jim Park

With the launch of the battery-electric Model 220EV, Peterbilt is wading into what is sure to become a crowded marketplace and the Model 220EV fits right into the pickup and delivery segment.

Photo: Jim Park

With the launch of the Model 220EV here at the CES Show in Las Vegas, Peterbilt is wading into what is sure to become a crowded marketplace. With a limited supply of battery-electric Class 4-6 trucks to choose from and rising consumer interest, the Model 220EV fits right into the pickup-and-delivery segment.  

The 220EV joins the previously announced Model 520EV and the Model 579EV in the Peterbilt electric vehicle lineup. In all, Peterbilt will have more than 30 electric vehicles in operation by the end of 2019 with customers representing refuse, regional haul, and city delivery applications.

"We think those three applications are going to have the most immediate and near-term payback for our customers," said Peterbilt General Manager Jason Skoog. "Today, we have Model 520EV’s and Model 579EV’s on the road with customers, experiencing real-world environments and performing well. This truck will be going into a major customer sometime later this summer."

In addition to the customer field trials, validation testing is underway at the Paccar Technical Center in Mount Vernon, Washington.

Using an e-axle frees up space between the frame rails for other components – in this case, batteries.
 - Photo: Jim Park

Using an e-axle frees up space between the frame rails for other components – in this case, batteries.

Photo: Jim Park

The zero-emission 220EV is powered by two TransPower battery packs with a total of 148 kWh and a Meritor Blue Horizon two-speed drive eAxle. It features a range of 100 miles and a recharge time of one hour when using a DC fast charging system, making it an ideal option for local pick-up and delivery operations.

"The big advantage to using an integrated motor in the drive axle is that we free up space between the frame rails for other components, in this case, the batteries," said Scott Newhouse, Peterbilt's chief engineer.

Peterbilt will begin delivering the 220EV in the summer of 2019.

Watch Newhouse explain more about the eAxle:

 
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