A rendering showcases the design of the new Tennessean Travel Stop, a project being built to replace the popular former travel facility that was destroyed in a fire last year.  -  Photo: The Tennessean Travel Stop

A rendering showcases the design of the new Tennessean Travel Stop, a project being built to replace the popular former travel facility that was destroyed in a fire last year.

Photo: The Tennessean Travel Stop

The historic Tennessean Travel Stop, located at I-65 and exit 22 (3686 Pulaski Hwy) in Cornersville, Tennessee, announced in a statement it has unveiled plans for its brand-new 25,000-square-foot building. A formal groundbreaking event was held on Friday, August 12, celebrating the start of construction on the site of the iconic fifty-year-old Tennessean Travel Stop, located roughly one hour south of Nashville.

The project's start comes roughly one year after the site's former building was destroyed by a grease fire started in the Tennessean's restaurant. Only one fueling station canopy was able to be salvaged from the existing facility, with all other features being designed and built from the ground up.

The Tennessean Travel Stop will showcase new amenities including a full-service cocktail bar, an ice cream shop with donuts and coffee, and a quick-service deli with pizza, wings, and sandwiches. In addition, the Tennessean BBQ restaurant will return to serving the same recipes and buffets as before, adding more outdoor seating and a rooftop deck adjacent to the 2nd-floor bar. 

"We understand how important The Tennessean has been to the state of Tennessee, proudly serving national over-the-road truckers, travelers, and especially our incredibly loyal Cornersville community," said Gregory H. Sachs, owner of the Tennessean Travel Stop and founder and CEO of Sachs Capital Group in the statement. "I'm extremely proud to unveil the new Tennessean Travel Stop. Our dedicated team has been working diligently throughout this past year to design and plan a more expansive facility."

The architecture and interior design team at the Nashville-based firm Powell created a wide variety of space options for use by truckers, the local community, and those looking to take a break from their travel journeys. The construction, led by the team at Impetus, is slated to take approximately twelve months to complete.

The temporarily closed truckstop broke ground on Friday, August 12, celebrating the start of construction on the site of the iconic fifty-year-old Tennessean Travel Stop.  -  Photo: Deborah Lockridge

The temporarily closed truckstop broke ground on Friday, August 12, celebrating the start of construction on the site of the iconic fifty-year-old Tennessean Travel Stop.

Photo: Deborah Lockridge

"We are really excited to be on board to bring the iconic Tennessean Travel Stop back to life," added Craig Floyd, the Nashville market leader for Impetus. "Our team has begun work on demolishing the former building and we will soon be underway with vertical construction in the weeks ahead. We will certainly be pressing forward quickly to deliver this project on a fast track for the benefit of the region, and for our clients at Sachs Capital Group."

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