Currently, drivers undergoing an in-station inspection need to go through manual steps on an ELD to transfer their logs to the inspection site’s computer, including entering the officer’s inspector code. - Graphic: Drivewyze 

Currently, drivers undergoing an in-station inspection need to go through manual steps on an ELD to transfer their logs to the inspection site’s computer, including entering the officer’s inspector code.

Graphic: Drivewyze 

In a move to improve speed, efficiency and accuracy at weigh station inspection sites, Drivewyze has announced open enrollment for automated electronic e-Inspections at weigh stations in three participating states.

“For those using our weigh station bypass service, it means in-station inspections no longer require drivers to manually submit their [hours-of-service] files and inspectors can complete inspections in a matter of minutes versus the traditional 30-60 minute processing time at weigh stations,” explains Brian Heath, CEO and president of Drivewyze, in a press release. “Our system automates traditional manual processes and everyone benefits -- it's a major step forward in the modernization of roadside inspections.”

Inspection sites in Maryland, Maine, and Virginia are the first states to partner with Drivewyze to make e-Inspections a reality. Other states are following suit as state agency software is upgraded or enhanced to process e-inspections.

“We’ve done testing and trials with major fleets and state inspection sites to prove the accuracy and efficiency of e-Inspections,” said Heath. “We’ve found that a ‘clean’ Level III inspection can be reduced from a 30-minute detention, to mere minutes. That allows the driver and fleet to improve or maintain their safety score while logging more miles. It also frees the inspection officer from time-consuming manual data entry so they can concentrate efforts on trucks that truly do need inspecting.”

Currently, drivers undergoing an in-station inspection need to go through manual steps on an ELD to transfer their logs to the inspection site’s computer, including entering the officer’s inspector code.

“This not only takes time, manual entry leads to input errors,” said Heath. “If the driver, for example, mistypes the officer’s inspector code, and the logs can’t be transferred, it’s an HOS violation. Likewise, if a driver isn’t familiar with the ELD and doesn’t know how to transfer logs, or locate the Driver Instruction Sheet, the carrier can be dinged on their safety score. With the advent of e-Inspections to automate HOS data transfer, problems sending logs to inspections sites are no longer an issue.”

According to Heath, Drivewyze is partnering with leading ELD vendors to ensure back-end systems are ready for Drivewyze’s e-Inspection services. Those partners include Platform Science, and Geotab.

Heath added: “E-Inspections are a milestone in our mission to revolutionize transportation safety and efficiency. Agencies do not have enough inspectors to stop every truck and this has caused a data sufficiency problem with CSA. Safety scores lag actual carrier performance and many fleets cannot benefit from bypass services or qualify for load opportunities due to outdated safety scores or limited data in CSA. E-Inspections will help solve these problems. Agencies will have a force multiplier to deliver their ‘maintenance of effort’ and allow officers to focus resources on high-risk vehicles. Saving 30 to 60 minutes on a driver’s route is a huge impact on drivers, fleets and shippers. Reducing the time to conduct in-station inspections is just as important to agencies that struggle to meet mandates with tight budgets and limited resources.”

Software activation is free for Drivewyze PreClear customers, and available through participating Drivewyze ELD partners.

How e-Inspection Works

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  1. The ELD automatically sends the driver’s logs to the roadside inspection site when an e-Inspection is started, eliminating manual transfer steps entirely.
  2. An officer conducting the inspection can view vehicle, carrier and driver-level information and has their inspection report form automatically pre-filled at the start of their inspection.
  3. The inspector evaluates the vehicle and driver, and decides if any further validation or investigation is required without having to manually search multiple systems to verify the carrier, vehicle and driver credentials.
  4. When the officer is satisfied, the inspection can be completed at the touch of a button, saving significant time and improving the accuracy of the inspection.
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