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Highways

2017 HDT Fact Book: Highways

HDT’s Fourth Annual Fact Book is an overview of the trucking industry by the numbers. Each of the graphs, charts, tables, and infographics are designed to offer a snapshot of the current industry and serve as a reference guide Check out the full Fact Book in the digital edition.

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Bicyclists Were Original Advocates for Good Roads

Motorists and truckers can thank touring "wheelmen" and isolated farmers for together pressuring lawmakers to improve primitive dirt byways, notes Tom Berg in the Trailer Talk blog.

Motor Trucks in the Wild West

In 1919, a young Army officer learned firsthand how important modern roads were for his rapidly transforming young nation. And trucking benefits from the lessons he learned to this very day.

The Future of Tolling in America

Regardless of what happens to improve infrastructure at the federal level, state and local governments are increasingly taking steps to improve roads and bridges through tolling.

2015 HDT Fact Book

Our second annual HDT Fact Book, aims to give you additional numbers and statistics that can help you in your business.

When the Road Meets the Rubber

Irregular or accelerated tire wear is annoying and expensive, but there's something else eating away at your expensive assets: the pavement itself.

2015 Road Atlas Created Specifically for Commercial Drivers

Rand McNally has released the 2015 edition of the Motor Carriers' Road Atlas, a guide for over-the-road and other large-vehicle drivers.

Infrastructure and a 1949 Hudson

Can a man in a rusted old 1949 Hudson help bring attention to the nation's crumbling infrastructure and help grow interest in funding improvements? Editor in Chief Deborah Lockridge introduces you to Dan McNichol and his Dire States project in her "All That's Trucking" blog.

This Week's Trucking in the Media

Our new weekly roundup of how trucking's being covered in the mainstream media, from the new certified medical examiner program to highway funding commentary.

Is Our Infrastructure Crumbling, or Not?

In the debate over how to increase highway funding, the call is often made to raise fuel taxes or develop other funding mechanisms to fix our crumbling highways and bridges, a problem brought tragically to the forefront by the collapse of the I-35W bridge in Minneapolis in August 2007 that killed 13 people. Now, clouding the debate in Washington is the claim that our infrastructure really isn't crumbling after all.