The American Transportation Research Institute is asking for input on a driver retention survey.  -  Image: Canva/HDT Illustration

The American Transportation Research Institute is asking for input on a driver retention survey.

Image: Canva/HDT Illustration

As part of a larger study on the impacts of truck driver detention on the industry, the American Transportation Research Institute is asking motor carriers and owner-operators to participate in a new ATRI survey on the consequences of driver detention in the trucking industry.

Driver detention, time spent waiting at shipper or receiver facilities outside of loading/unloading, is a longstanding issue in the trucking industry. ATRI’s Research Advisory Committee identified the need for new research to document the  consequences of driver detention for carriers, truck drivers, shippers, and the economy as a whole.

Driver detention is everyone’s problem, and it isn’t going away,” said Stephen A. Truono, NFI Industries executive vice president and  chief risk officer, in a news release.

“While carriers have made efforts to address it in recent years, ATRI’s comprehensive detention research will shed light on the impact and scale of driver detention on both trucking and supply chains in general.”

The short survey asks motor carriers and owner-operators to share details on their experiences with driver detention and how it relates to their operations as well as their strategies for mitigating detention.

Later this year, ATRI said, it will release two additional surveys as a part of this research, one for company drivers and one for shippers/receivers.

Driver detention ranked ninth in ATRI’s 19th Annual Top Industry Issues Survey, which was released during the American Trucking Associations’ annual management conference this past October.

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