Each station is designed to minimize environmental impact by producing power onsite through RNG turbines and solar. - Rendering: Cyclum

Each station is designed to minimize environmental impact by producing power onsite through RNG turbines and solar.

Rendering: Cyclum

Cyclum Renewables has plans to construct a national network of renewable fuel truck stops powered by renewable natural gas.

The network of large-scale renewable truck stops will facilitate the transition of commercial trucking towards sustainable practices, Cyclum officials said in a press release. They will dispense compressed renewable natural gas, biodiesel, hydrogen, and electricity for electric-vehicle charging.

Each station is designed to minimize environmental impact by producing power onsite through RNG turbines and solar, while operating with sustainable business practice, company officials said.

Through a partnership with sister company Gess RNG Biogas USA, the companies will purchase carbon-negative RNG as well as design and construct renewable microgrids for Gess RNG Biogas USA production plants.

Cyclum is locating sites for its first phase of stations, focusing on initial target markets along the West Coast and in North Carolina. On the West Coast, Cyclum is targeting the Interstate 5 corridor, spanning from San Diego, California, to Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Special attention will be paid to major ports along this interstate, including San Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and Vancouver. In North Carolina, Cyclum will focus on major trucking thoroughfares surrounding Charlotte, including I-85, I-77 and I-95.

To facilitate the design and construction of these stations, Cyclum has partnered with KD3 Design Studio on the architectural services for site amenities and Dawood Engineering on infrastructure needs.

“Customer spaces will be bright, open, inviting, and comfortable to support rest, revitalization, activity and nourishment with an airy, greenery-filled central community lounge, convenience store, casual fast-food restaurant, extraordinary site amenities and private recharge pods for drivers,” Kurt Oravecz, KD3's principal architect, said.

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