Latest Faymonville heavy-haul trailer for North America is a six-axle, triple-extendable, single-dropdeck flatbed for hauling extra-heavy and oversized cargoes.
 - Photos: Faymonville Group

Latest Faymonville heavy-haul trailer for North America is a six-axle, triple-extendable, single-dropdeck flatbed for hauling extra-heavy and oversized cargoes.

Photos: Faymonville Group

Here’s an interesting heavy haul trailer from Faymonville, a European manufacturer based in Luxembourg that sells some of its products in North America. This one’s called the MultiMax, and is a 3+3 single-drop design that’s extendable up to 77 feet and can be configured in various ways to handle extra heavy and outsized cargo.

“Three plus three” means two sets of three axles each, with timber decks above them. Each axle group is steerable and actively suspended so height of the deck can be raised or lowered to suit the pavement it’s on and the obstacles it moves over. A high railroad crossing is an example.

In tight turns, forward tridem caster-steers while the rear group counter-steers with a kingpin-geometry mechanism thaat can be remotely controlled, the builder says.
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In tight turns, forward tridem caster-steers while the rear group counter-steers with a kingpin-geometry mechanism thaat can be remotely controlled, the builder says.

In tight corners, the forward bogie caster-steers to follow the tractor while the rear bogie counter-steers using a king-pin geometry, and has a remote control override, the company says.

The forward bogie is double extendable, while another extension connects with the rear bogie. For normal transport while empty or loaded, all components are closed up and the trailer becomes a more or less standard 53-footer.

Except for its six axles, a closed-up MultiMax dropdeck looks fairly normal, and is a standard 53-foot length for transporting to a job site with no permits required.
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Except for its six axles, a closed-up MultiMax dropdeck looks fairly normal, and is a standard 53-foot length for transporting to a job site with no permits required.

Width is 100 inches, 2.3 inches narrower than your usual 53- by 102 flatbed or van, so it can be moved without permits, unless of course a load puts a combination vehicle over 80,000 pounds gross.

Hale Heavy Haul, a subsidiary of Hale Trailer, Brake & Wheel, sells Faymonville and other specialty trailers from 11 locations in eight eastern states.

Author

Tom Berg
Tom Berg

Senior Contributing Editor

Journalist since 1965, truck writer and editor since 1978. CDL-qualified; conducts road tests on new heavy-, medium- and light-duty tractors and trucks. Specializes in vocational trucks and trailers of all types.

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Journalist since 1965, truck writer and editor since 1978. CDL-qualified; conducts road tests on new heavy-, medium- and light-duty tractors and trucks. Specializes in vocational trucks and trailers of all types.

View Bio
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