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ATA: New Survey Shows Driver Pay Competitive

December 15, 2014

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Median pay for truck drivers is on par with the national median for U.S. households, while the trucking industry offers drivers “competitive" benefits, according to a new study from the American Trucking Associations.

Its 2014 Driver Compensation Study, which covers more than 130 fleets and more than 130,000 drivers, also shows annual employee driver compensation varied among carrier and trailer types.

The 2013 median pay for truckload national, irregular route van drivers was just over $46,000, while private fleet van drivers earned 58% more, at $73,000. While mileage-base pay packages are common, three out of four fleets pay drivers in multiple ways, according to the survey. The most frequent approach taken by a carrier utilizing two base pay methods was compensation by mileage and by hour.

"Fleets are raising pay and offering generous benefit packages in order to attract and keep their drivers in the face of a growing driver shortage," said ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello. "As the economy grows, we are seeing an ever more competitive driver market," Costello said. "The data in this report will be critical for fleets looking to recruit and retain the best drivers."

Among the study's other key findings:

  • In seven of the nine categories of drivers covered by the survey, pay met or exceeded the U.S. median household income of just over $53,000.
  • Nearly 80% of truckload fleets offered drivers paid holidays.
  • And 80% of private carriers not only offer a 401(k) retirement plan, but match employee contributions.

A copy of the report can be ordered through ATA’s website.

Comments

  1. 1. Brad Miller [ December 15, 2014 @ 04:29PM ]

    Who are the Kidding trucker pay still is not good, I did not earn even near that.

  2. 2. Craig Markowski [ December 15, 2014 @ 08:12PM ]

    It’s not a truck driver shortage but an enforceable compensation and safety issue.

    Since Federal, State or Local authorities do not enforce the laws when trucking companies cheat the drivers, paychecks usually fall far short of compensation earned .

    Complaints of extensive promised but unpaid diverted loads in the Texas oil country fall on deaf ears at the Department of Labor where they focus on “minimum wage issues” to companies who stretch the truth and mislead drivers about allowable axle spreads to leave the drivers personally liable for the thousands in overweight fines merely to be replaced with more of the trusting naive willing to take a chance to put food on their family’s table.

    And the local law enforcement who decline to prosecute the fully documented thousands in bad check’s paid to penalizing the drivers refusing to drive CDL risking overweight, poorly maintained death traps and fatigued conditions for endangering the unsuspecting public until the DOT finally shuts the shady companies down years later.

    It’s a question of trucking company integrity and accountability to attract and retain quality drivers.

  3. 3. Steve P [ December 16, 2014 @ 05:40AM ]

    What they do not say says it all. drivers away from home 300 plus days a year,cost of living on the road,not to mention the treatment they receive from shippers ,receivers and their own companies. Pay is most of it but as you see most employers do not live in a 8x8 box weeks at a time away from family.Does this not Account for extra pay.

  4. 4. Cliff [ December 16, 2014 @ 09:49AM ]

    When ATA gives out there latest round of stats, I am oft reminded of the statistition who drowned while crossing a river with a median depth of 2 feet. As is always the case, the devil is in the details. Of those median households ATA is comparing to, how many do not get OT for hours over 40 per week? How many have to stay at the job location 24/7 for days and weeks including, but not limited to, eating, sleeping, hygienic activities, and laundry? How many have their shift work schedule variable each day? The ATA has it agenda to promote data that benefits carriers and not drivers. Some of us actually have formal education beyond the 7th grade and know when someone is peeing down our back and telling us it's raining.

  5. 5. Cliff [ December 16, 2014 @ 09:55AM ]

    When ATA gives out there latest round of stats, I am oft reminded of the statistition who drowned while crossing a river with a median depth of 2 feet. As is always the case, the devil is in the details. Of those median households ATA is comparing to, how many do not get OT for hours over 40 per week? How many have to stay at the job location 24/7 for days and weeks including, but not limited to, eating, sleeping, hygienic activities, and laundry? How many have their shift work schedule variable each day? The ATA has it agenda to promote data that benefits carriers and not drivers. Some of us actually have formal education beyond the 7th grade and know when someone is peeing down our back and telling us it's raining.

 

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