Trailer Talk

European Cargo Securement Devices are Diverse

American and Canadian rules require stuff in a van or reefer to be tied down, but it’s out of sight and can be overlooked by inspectors.

November 30, 2016

SHARING TOOLS        | Print Subscribe
Koegel equipped its Cargo display trailer with various types of load-securing devices for several kinds of freight. This one includes curtain sides and a fold-up roof tarp for side and top loading. Photos: Koegel
Koegel equipped its Cargo display trailer with various types of load-securing devices for several kinds of freight. This one includes curtain sides and a fold-up roof tarp for side and top loading. Photos: Koegel

Every once in a while cargo securement seems to become an issue, whether from a coil of steel that’s fallen off a flatbed trailer and killed someone, or boxed merchandise busting through the walls of an overturned van that has formed a traffic-stopping mess. 

Securement straps and chains are visible on a flatbed but not inside a van, so many cargoes travel with nothing but pressure from adjacent commodities and trailer walls keeping them in place. Federal rules require stuff in a van or reefer to be tied down, too, but it’s ought of sight and evidently often overlooked by inspectors.  

Apparently this is a concern in Europe, too, because Koegel, a dominant trailer builder in Germany, recently displayed a van with numerous securement options aboard. That was at the giant IAA show in Hannover.

The trailer’s called the Cargo, and according to a Koegel press release, its features include a VarioFix perforated steel external frame equipped with 13 pairs of lashing rings for securing the load. Each ring can take 2,000 kilograms (4,400 pounds) of tensile force.

Inside, the IAA trailer had several optional load-securing packages in three rung sections for hauling waste paper, beverages, and tires, the release said. In addition to a riveted pallet limiting rail, the waste paper package had two rows of steel anchoring rails, a series of aluminum insertable slats or lattices, and aluminum telescoping beams to secure the load in or against the direction of travel.

Curtainside trailers would seem to need more securement devices than hard-sided vans, but the multi-strapped fabric holds together well in rollovers, builders say. 
Curtainside trailers would seem to need more securement devices than hard-sided vans, but the multi-strapped fabric holds together well in rollovers, builders say.

“Individual equipment for securing crates and barrels demonstrates how a plank tarpaulin can be used with six vertical aluminum slats on the left-hand side,” the release said. “On the right-hand side, this variant features two rows of aluminum lattices,” something like our logistics-tracks.  

Steel and aluminum tie-down points and lashing hooks and rails were on board to handle the other cargoes. “Koegel's solutions now match the guidelines set out by Michelin for the transport of tires” – an observation that describes some European customers’ demands that shipments to be transported safely and without damage.

In North America, it’s not unusual for trailers to arrive at docks and upon opening doors, receivers see a jumble of boxes instead of items neatly stacked as they should be. There’s no shortage of equipment available from American and Canadian manufacturers to secure cargo, from load bars to straps and log channels to plastic wrap, that keeps individual items on their pallets. They just have to be used.

Comments

  1. 1. Richard Pingel [ December 01, 2016 @ 10:08AM ]

    The final paragraph talks about the problems we have in the U.S.,but I think they are more a case of the differences between American and European operations. The reason for the lack of securement in the U.S., is more a case of the carriers to use drop and hook. Unless the shippe decides to bear the cost of air bags, etc., the load doesn't even get a load bar put in because the driver will not take the responsibility of breaking the seal.

 

Comment On This Story

Name:  
Email:  
Comment: (Maximum 2000 characters)  
Leave this field empty:
* Please note that every comment is moderated.

Author Bio

sponsored by

Tom Berg

Senior Contributing Editor

Journalist since 1965, truck writer and editor since 1978. CDL-qualified; conducts road tests on new heavy-, medium- and light-duty tractors and trucks. Specializes in vocational and hybrid vehicles.

Newsletter

We offer e-newsletters that deliver targeted news and information for the entire fleet industry.

GotQuestions?
sponsored by
sponsor logo

ELDs and Telematics

Scott Sutarik from Geotab will answer your questions and challenges

View All
GotQuestions?

Sleeper Cab Power

Steve Carlson from Xantrex will answer your questions and challenges

View All