Fleet Management

Driver Turnover Hits 87% at Large Truckload Carriers

October 13, 2015

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Driver turnover at large truckload fleets rose to an annualized rate of 87% in the second quarter of 2015 according to Bob Costello, chief economist of American Trucking Associations.

Despite a rise of three percentage points over the first quarter, the figure is still below recent averages and turnover at large fleets is at its lowest point since the second quarter of 2011. In 2014, large fleet turnover averaged 95%.

“While below recent averages, driver turnover is still high and a sign of a very competitive market for qualified drivers,” said Costello. “We repeatedly hear from carriers that they are unable to find enough qualified drivers, leading to fears of a growing driver shortage and these numbers reflect that.”

By contrast, smaller truckload fleets, with revenues of less than $30 million, fell seven percentage points to 76%, hitting its lowest mark since the third quarter of 2013. In a recent report, ATA projected the driver shortage to hit 48,000 drivers by the end of the year – the highest recorded level yet.

“America’s trucking industry moves nearly 70% of the country’s freight and we need drivers to do it,” said Costello. “While turnover is not at historic highs, it is still high enough to merit concern. Fleets need to hire 89,000 a drivers a year to keep pace with retirements and projected growth, so ensuring an adequate pool of qualified drivers is critical.”

Comments

  1. 1. Jean [ October 14, 2015 @ 07:12AM ]

    Somehow I don't feel sorry for the industry at all. Anytime the government needs money they know they can get it from the trucking industry. And that is in whatever form they can. It's like the flavor of the week. Now days if you are over 50, overweight, over a determined neck size, or over limits on blood pressure stats that some special interest group obviously had something to do with to push bp medicine, and the same with sugar A1C1 (or whatever the acronym is) - then you are a potential killer truck driver. Stop trying to invent the wheel folks. If you would focus more on paying a person an honest wage for an honest days work you would solve the majority of the problems out there. No man/woman should have to work 70 hours a week for what the rest of the country makes in 40. Realistically the 70 hours is a joke and winds up to be more like 100. And now I hear that to fill the shortage there is a force trying to pass the law to allow 18 year olds to fill the gap. There is a reason why they call truck driving a profession and not a practice.

  2. 2. Dennis [ October 14, 2015 @ 07:47AM ]

    Jean must of you post I agree with. The part I don't agree with is you being against 18 year olds driving truck. Why is it Ok for 18 year olds to go to war for this this country but not to get a job they want? Some of them even drive truck in the military so why shouldn't they be able to drive as s civilian? If a person is old enough to die for this country then they should be old enough to have a job in this country.

  3. 3. Randy [ October 14, 2015 @ 07:55AM ]

    My drivers make anywhere from $60g to $90g a year, depending on how much they are willing to work. I was unaware that the entire "rest" of the country makes that much doing just any 8 to 5 job. With this revelation I'm sure to be losing all my drivers any day now....

  4. 4. David [ October 14, 2015 @ 08:23AM ]

    Well let's all leave Jean alone. She meant what we all think I'm sure. I agree with her summing up the industry, so what a few facts were left out.
    Dennis & Randy
    There's a reason we require 21 year old minimum, it started before I started in 1975. Yes I got my first license at 18, I drove only in my home state. But OTR 21 is not a mistake. We still need it.

    This industry has had plenty of time to correct the shortage no one wanted to spend a dime. Now the industry is facing the end result of putting it off. Good pull out your checkbook, don't dismantle the safety any further. Jean is correct, a man with CRASH org. Is sitting in on and helping to decide our future right now. Read "Riding with the Enemy" then remember that a Medical Review head, was the President of the APENA society? Jeans correct.

    Drivers should all go home and rest for a few days, we all deserve to make a living and enjoy being with our families. Take a break, more importantly VOTE, VOTE, VOTE.....

  5. 5. Dennis [ October 14, 2015 @ 02:53PM ]

    David if you want to keep 21 for OTR then you have to be for 21 minimum fire the military. If they are old enough to die for you they are old enough to drive for you. It's not right to allow them to do one without the other.

  6. 6. stephen w [ October 15, 2015 @ 05:13PM ]

    I was in a truck accident on jan 2 2015 was hit from behind by a ryder truck in a snow storm my truck is still in repair shop my employer told worker comp that was not injured and ended up in homeless shelter and the later was able to get another job but the injury from the accident making me have much pain every day my former employer still owes my $9.000 in back pay This industry cheats driver when they get hurt. I got got hurt when a car stop in front of me in a snow storm. that would not have been driving if my employer had done the custom paper work. 5193578686

  7. 7. MIKE [ October 17, 2015 @ 04:29AM ]

    WOW DENNIS YOU MUST BE HEAD OF A DRIVING SCHOOL AND LOW ON BUSINESS AND DON'T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT TRUCKING.

    FIRST OFF IF THE FEDERAL LAW WOULD CHANGE AND ALLOW 18 YR. OLD TO DRIVE, I HOPE THE MAKE THE REGULATIONS VERY STRONG LIKE, TO BE A TRAINER, YOU HAVE TO BE 3 YRS. ACCIDENT FREE, OR NO MAJOR VIOLATIONS, YOU HAVE TO HAVE 6 OR MORE YRS. OF OTR EXP., AND A SCHOOL STUDENT IN TRAINING MUST ATTEND 6 MONTHS OF SCHOOL AND I8 MONTHS OF OTR TRAINING WITH A QUALIFIED TRAINER.

    DENNIS YOU MUST BE FOR HAVING OUR YOUNG PEOPLE KILLED AND THINNING OUT OUR POPULATION THIS WAY, MOST OF THE YOUNG PEOPLE IN OUR MILITARY ENDS UP IN THIS CATAGORY BECAUSE OF LACK OF TRAINING.

    THESE SO CALLED TRUCK DRIVING SCHOOLS IS ONLY IN IT FOR THE MONEY, NOT TO GET PROPERLY TRAINED DRIVERS OUT ON THE ROADS, NOT FOR SAFETY, OR ANYTHING ELSE, JUST THE MONEY, AND THAT GOES FOR AN INDEPENDANT SCHOOL OR A COMPANY SCHOOL.

    YES THE PAY IS VERY LOW FOR OUR PROFESSION FOR ALL THE RISK THAT WE TAKE, FOR THE LABOR WORK THAT WE HAVE TO PERFORM, AND MOST COMPANIES ADVERTISES THAT YOU WILL EARN $ 40K TO $50K YOUR FIRST YEAR AND THAT IS IF YOUR WILLING TO DO ALOT OF SITTING AND DOING MANUAL LABOR, YES THERE IS A FEW COMPANIES THAT PAYS WELL AND YOU DON'T HAVE TO TOUCH THE FREIGHT OR STAND ON THE DOCKS TO COUNT YOUR FREIGHT AS IT IS BEING LOADED.

    I GOT TIRED OF DRIVING OTHER PEOPLE JUNK AND DOING THERE LABOR FOR FREE JUST BECAUSE THATS THERE AGREEMENT WITH THE CUSTOMER TO GET THERE FREIGHT, SO I BOUGHT MY OWN TRUCK AND IT IS IN GOOD SHAPE IT PASSES ALL THE INSPECTIONS AND I DON'T TOOUCH ANYONES FREIGHT, AND NO I AM NOT OBEAST, I AM 6'2, 275 LBS,, 16 IN. NECK, AND I'M IN GOOD SHAPE FOR BEING 50 YRS. OLD AND YES I SPENT 8 YRS. IN THE MARINE CORPS. AS A FORCED RECON SARGENT.

  8. 8. Dennis [ October 17, 2015 @ 08:51AM ]

    Mike calm down and write yelling. Any time somebody had to start by saying "you must" tells me they don't really know what they ate talking about. Let's take the first thing you say first. I have nothing to do with any school, so you are wrong on that count. Next you are probably right. I don't know anything about trucking. In over 20 years I have blindly trudged along and haven't managed to learn anything. As for your ideas about changing federal "rules" not law, see I do know a little, some of your ideas are good and I agree with them. I don't know exactly how to implement them but what we have now isn't working the best it could. It doesn't matter about the age here the training needs to be more. Oh fyi the company I currently work for I've been with for almost 13 years. And trained for 6.5 years. Before that I trained with another company 2 years and before that I trained school bus drivers for 2.5 years. Yep you are right again. I don't know anything. Trucking had been good enough for me. I raised 4 kids put 2 through state universities, 1 through private college and one through trade school. That says to me I earned enough money at this life style. Health wise, 6 ft 210lbs 15.5 neck in good health. Ok you got me I was only in the Navy for 4 years during the Vietnam War. All that said I still say if you are going to send or allow to be sent 18 year olds to die for this country they should be able to have any job any other adult has a chance to have. With proper training the age won't matter. I've seen some 50 year old out here that didn't have the maturity to fetch shipping karts at Walmart but you haven't said anything about getting rid of them. Last point young man 64 years old but am willing to learn even from young kids like you. So calmly explain exactly and precisely what is wrong with my ideas.

  9. 9. Ken Snead [ October 22, 2015 @ 08:42PM ]

    Does anyone see what the main issue is? Its Cost, to the trucking Companies and Own-Ops. as well.The politicians Are creating COMPLETE NEW industries for their "Friends". The Testing Centers Now SOMEONE wants Hair testing. That ends My Saturday 6-pack, because Sunday nite it will be in my HAIR Nobody wants to Go thru that!!!.Or what about about that Wiskey, I drank two weeks ago, If i'm involved in an accident, "God Forbid" AS the driver I would be at fault determined by a strand of my hair. We better stock up on GROCERIES I see a big price increase coming down THE road

 

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