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Clean Diesels Claim 33% of On-Highway Market

July 2, 2014

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More than one-third of all medium and heavy duty commercial trucks registered in the United States are now equipped with newer technology clean diesel engines.

According to new data compiled by IHS Automotive for the Diesel Technology Forum, 2.9 million of the nation's 8.8 million trucks are now powered clean diesels.

“Because more than 95% of all heavy-duty trucks are diesel-powered it is significant that more than one-third of these trucks are near-zero emission vehicles,” says Allen Schaeffer, executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum. “Diesel trucks are literally the driving force behind goods movement in the U.S. and worldwide economies, so the fact that the clean diesel fleet is increasing is good news for improved fuel efficiency and the environment. These new trucks are so clean that it now takes more than 60 of today’s clean diesel trucks to equal the emissions from a single 1988 truck."

The new data includes total registration information on Class 3-8 trucks from 2007 through 2013 in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The Top 5 states for 2007 or newer diesels by vehicle population are Indiana (50.4%), Utah (44.8%), Oklahoma (41.9%), Texas (41.9%) and Wyoming (41.4%).

The Top 5 states for 2010 or newer diesels by vehicle population are Indiana (28.7%), Oklahoma (26.6%), Utah (23.4%), Texas (20.7%) and Nebraska (20.5%).

The new clean diesel technology has reduced emissions from heavy-duty diesel trucks and buses by 99% for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and 98% for particulate emissions (PM).

Beginning in 2007, all heavy duty diesel trucks sold had to meet particulate emissions levels of no more than 0.01 grams per brake horse-power hour (g/HP-hr).

“Last year was the fifth consecutive year of increased penetration of the new clean diesel trucks in the fleet, reflecting the continuing confidence that American truckers have in the performance and fuel efficiency improvements of new technology diesel engines,” Schaeffer adds.

The Diesel Technology Forum has more information about clean diesel trucks.

Comments

  1. 1. 4b [ July 03, 2014 @ 05:48AM ]

    And the U.S. fleet is older than it's ever been.. Because the new trucks are over priced and unreliable...

  2. 2. GREG FOREMAN [ July 03, 2014 @ 07:16AM ]

    I find surprising that for all of its efforts, California does not appear in the top ten states. What gives? Did the study ignore California on purpose(conspiracy approach) or is there a basic flaw in the analysis’s model(analytical approach)? For all of CARB's, California Air Resources Board, efforts and requirements, one would expect the state to appear at least in the top ten states.

  3. 3. Kenneth Scott [ July 03, 2014 @ 07:29AM ]

    I have a 2012 W900 it is a good truck and the 550 Cummins is a good engine but the SCR system is junk. The worst business decision I made in 40 years of trucking was buying this truck. Let me say again the truck and engine are great but it is the EPA part of this truck that is junk and has ruin my retirement plans. If u have a good old truck keep it. My definition of junk is 15 days of down time and cost of parts that equal $15000 in six months and forget trying to get in a shop quick , because they are working on other EPA junk. I can only hope there is a law suit on this because I feel truly this product should not have been sold.

  4. 4. Jonathan Llamas [ July 08, 2014 @ 08:26PM ]

    @Greg Foreman, Im surprised too! I can't believe that for all the hoops Califorrnias CARB is having us go through, we didn't even make the top 10. I wonder if its because of the constant changes that keep pushing back the truck requirements, and allowing more time for owners to replace their trucks.

  5. 5. Jonathan Llamas [ July 08, 2014 @ 08:26PM ]

    Greg Foreman, Im surprised too! I can't believe that for all the hoops Califorrnias CARB is having us go through, we didn't even make the top 10. I wonder if its because of the constant changes that keep pushing back the truck requirements, and allowing more time for owners to replace their trucks.

 

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