Equipment

Aerodynamics

1  -  3  of  3

Photos: The New Western Star 5700XE

The target market for Western Star's 5700XE is owner-operators and small- to medium-sized fleets wanting a unique look and brand. Large fleets could position the truck as a driver incentive or reward truck for high-performing drivers.

Market research conducted by Western Star showed that even the die-hard classic truck aficionados acknowledge that fuel economy should be an important part of a truck spec. So Western Star has a delivered a truly classic styled truck with aerodynamic performance they say goes toe-to-toe with any truck on the road today. Here's a closer look at the 5700XE. Read more about it here.

View Photos

Tags: DTNA, Western Star, Detroit, Aerodynamics

Visions of Future Trucks

The huge IAA commercial truck show in Hanover, Germany, in 2012, included this eye magnet, the "aerodynamically optimized road train" from MAN and Krone, both prominent vehicle builders in Europe.

In our December issue, we talked to truck makers about what we can expect on commercial trucks in the next five to 10 years. For this photo gallery we compiled real concept trucks and those just on paper.

View Photos

Tags: Freightliner, Peterbilt, EPA, Navistar, Volvo, MAN, Aerodynamics

A Change in Aerodynamics

Kenworth's Advantage tractor-trailer is a working concept vehicle engineered to produce optimum aerodynamics. This photo shows three enhancements to the basic vehicle design: wheel covers, trailer side skirts and an advanced drag reduction device called a "boat tail" from ATDynamics. Stacking certain technologies often produces better results, but the total improvement achieved won't necessarily be the sum advertised by the product suppliers.

Most of the low-hanging aerodynamic fruit has already been plucked from the engineering tree. Truck makers and their design teams are now actively exploring options they would have ignored a decade ago. It's all about the cost of fuel.

The big shift to slope-nosed aero trucks began nearly 20 years ago, and since then engineers and designers have been refining the design. Today we see tweaks and twists yielding just the tiniest of gains, yet they are all steps in the right direction. What follows is a pictorial review of some of the changes we've seen in recent years -- some dramatic, some very subtle, but all aimed at killing fewer bugs.

By Jim Park, Equipment Editor

View Photos

Tags: Aerodynamics

« Previous1Next »

Newsletter

We offer e-newsletters that deliver targeted news and information for the entire fleet industry.



GotQuestions?

LUBRICANTS

The expert, Mark Betner from Citgo will answer your questions
Ask a question

Sponsored by


WHEEL ENDS SOLUTIONS

Wheel end expert Jeff Geist from STEMCO will answer your questions
Ask a question

Sponsored by

Magazine