Drivers

Two More States Issue Emergency Hauling Declarations

December 16, 2013

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Photo courtesy of MnDOT.
Photo courtesy of MnDOT.

Governors of two states has issued emergency declarations, waiving federal hours-of-service regulations, for some truckers due to cold weather and fuel shortages.

In Maine, Gov. Paul LePage has issued a proclamation running through Dec. 27 waving hours-of-service rules for truckers hauling heating fuel and bulk petroleum fuels.

The order is on the FMCSA website

South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard says the state is facing potentially low inventories of propane and heating fuel and has also waived federal hour-of-service rules.

It is set to expire at the end of the emergency, but no later than the end of the year.

The order is available online

The moves follows governors in other states recently issuing similar emergency orders due to shortages of various fuels, including diesel.  

A list of recent emergency declarations is available from the FMCSA. 

Comments

  1. 1. Steve [ December 17, 2013 @ 03:31AM ]

    I think it's a good idea for truckers hauling fuel to fall asleep at the wheel and crash. Why do idiots get voted into office ?

  2. 2. lastgoodusername [ December 17, 2013 @ 02:07PM ]

    This story is so stupid, correct that, so gonna become the norm. Winter comes this time of year, EVERY year. This summer it was too hot for the cows and the bull haulers got a pass. With only 24 hours in a day , the folks in Oregon are having trouble getting enough logs to the mills. This is only the beginning , wait till Queen Anne and her Masters get those electro logamatic machines mandatory. Shock absorbers are installed in all different types of machinery. they extend and compress to allow for movement and flex. Most all times, they work best when they are allowed to do their designed function. Removing flex and installing a rigid mount will usually result in failure. Do we really want to have to go to the goverment every time bullshit creek overflows and get permission to throw the log book away , so we can adjust our schedule , however slight it might be, to do our jobs? Am I the only one who sees this for what it is? Someone with power , money and common sense , PLEASE save us from the ATA and the Trucking Alliance and the officials they have bought out and sold their kool-aid to. PLEASE.

  3. 3. kerfluffel [ December 18, 2013 @ 04:49AM ]

    So typical of this administration! Create a rule that looks good on paper but the first time the wind wind blows you give everyone an emergency exemption because it doesn't work. This is what you get when you have no real world experience!
    The main thing is THEY make the rules and THEY hand out the exemptions.
    If you don't like it ....Tough!

  4. 4. tracy george [ December 18, 2013 @ 06:18AM ]

    What happened to safety?! Safety?!! SAFETY?!!!

  5. 5. Steve [ December 21, 2013 @ 02:34PM ]

    It is only safety when the rich is not doing with out

  6. 6. John [ December 22, 2013 @ 12:51PM ]

    What about the agricultural exemption in the spring and fall? There are NO rules concerning the transportation of anhydrous ammonia. (HAZ-MAT). I personally know of a driver that has been on-duty over 36 hrs. And there's NOTHING TO PREVENT him from working that much. Any time he's hauling ammonia, he's exempt from all rules! He can be overweight, out of hours, whatever. He makes great money, but his day will come when he goes to sleep at the wheel. Hopefully, if that day comes, he won't take any innocent lives with his.

 

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