Trailer Talk

Lighting

1  -  4  of  4

Why Can't Those 3 Upper ID Lights Be Mounted Low?

They'd be safer to reach for repairs, but they're up there for some good reasons.

On the move, they're still visible -- and more artsy. Photo by Jim Park

January 8, 2015

The three identification lights at the top-rear of the trailer, mounted around the center line of the vehicle, are to alert following drivers that the vehicle equipped with these lights is wider than 80 inches.

Tags: Regulations, Safety, Trailers, Lighting

Author: Tom Berg | Posted @ Thursday, January 8, 2015 1:15 PM | » Comments(0)

Squinty Tail Lights Have a Reliability Benefit

July 2, 2014

Tom Berg spots an unusual trailer lighting system on the road. Grote LED light bars need only three pigtails to connect to the sealed wiring harness, reducing the chances for corrosion and electrical failures, he explains in his Trailer Talk blog.

Tags: Trailers, Fontaine, Grote, Lighting, LEDs, Flatbed Trailers

Author: Tom Berg | Posted @ Wednesday, July 2, 2014 12:00 AM | » Comments(0)

Done Properly and Legally, Supplemental Signal Lights Enhance Safety

In heavy street traffic, a flashing light cues motorists to react early by slowing down or moving over to avoid being delayed -- but they also can cause confusion.

June 16, 2014

The Transportation Safety Equipment Institute reports that its member companies are seeing an increase in requests to add innovative lighting devices, and questions arise about their legality. Senior Editor Tom Berg takes a closer look in his Trailer Talk blog.

Tags: Lighting, Auxiliary Lighting, Transportation Safety Equipment Institute, Truck-Lite, Peterson Manufacturing, Trailers, Safety, Regulations

Author: Tom Berg | Posted @ Monday, June 16, 2014 12:00 AM | » Comments(0)

Amber Rear Turn Signals Are Safer Than Red, But Few Use Them

A light flashing yellow means "turn" and one flashing red means "stop." The result is less confusion for drivers behind.

Tanker fleets are more likely to use amber turn signals than other operators. This trailer also has white backup lights.

March 13, 2014

Lights on the rear of most vehicles have all red lights because that's all the regulation requires. Maybe that should change.

Tags: Safety, Trailers, Lighting, Truck-Lite, Wabash National

Author: Tom Berg | Posted @ Thursday, March 13, 2014 12:00 AM | » Comments(1)

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