Market Trends

Beware of Expunged MVR Records

March 11, 2011

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By Mike Antich
 
Can violations, such as speeding tickets and DUIs, be expunged from an MVR? The answer is yes, and it is occurring with greater frequency – more so in some jurisdictions than others. For instance, one fleet manager reports, “The most notorious jurisdiction is Puerto Rico.” He cites employees in Puerto Rico who successfully expunged not one, but a series of moving violations from their MVRs. Illinois and Pennsylvania are two states where expungement of driving violation records is also occurring with greater frequency. “We had one employee with a DUI in Illinois who was successful in having it expunged. This was a two-year-old DUI,” said the fleet manager. Another example cited by a fleet manager is: “The prior MVR showed a driver with four speeding tickets, but these violations were expunged from the driver’s record when I ordered a new MVR.”

What is Expungement?
In terms of MVRs, expungement is a legal procedure to remove from view part of an individual’s driving record. In some jurisdictions, expunged records can still be considered by courts in future cases or used by law enforcement and government agencies for limited purposes. This should be of concern to fleet managers. The legal question is whether the prior MVR with the speeding violations or DUI is “discoverable” if there is a future lawsuit. What is your company’s liability exposure by allowing an employee to continue driving for company business after knowing a record was expunged? Legal opinions go both ways. However, if you are a defendant, guess which position the plaintiff’s attorney will argue.  The critical question, explains negligent entrustment defense attorney Rick Alaniz, is to make sure you can demonstrate your “due diligence” in vetting your drivers. “This is one of the areas of the law where the process you use is as important as the actual result,” said Alaniz.

Expungement cases are more frequent with employees who require a commercial driver’s license (CDL). Drivers with prior infractions often hire attorneys to seal or expunge records so they do not appear on an MVR. For instance, the State of Illinois allows, under certain circumstances, the sealing or expungement of parts of the records of a conviction. Sealing a conviction prevents the public, including employers, from gaining access to that record. One CDL driver wrote online: “I had to have a lawyer expunge all my tickets off of my driving record because no company would take me in their CDL training program.”

Although a CDL driver may succeed in expunging his or her records, this violates Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) regulations. “The FMCSA has a regulation that requires states to process violations as written, and not allow expunging, masking, deferred judgment, or diversion of violations when it comes to CDL licensed drivers,” said Thomas Bray, transportation editor for J. J. Keller & Associates, Inc. “However, many local courts are not familiar with this rule and still allow the practices of masking, deferring, diverting, and expunging.”

States keep motor vehicle records on all drivers, but the duration of these records vary by state. In general, most states allow convictions of ticketed moving violations to remain on a driver’s history for three, five, seven, or 10 years. “Don’t forget about older MVR records,” said Alaniz. “Expunged records mean that going forward, a driver will have his record clear, but his previous MVR, which you should retain, will show the original violation.”

In most cases, the only way to remove violations from a driving record is by the passage of time. However, each state has a different policy that allows someone to expunge violations from a driving record. Laws and conditions that specify when a record can be sealed or expunged vary by case and by state. In most states, to have a record expunged, it must be a first-time offense, but not always. Most often there is a period before a petition can be made to the courts to have an expungement. To be eligible to dismiss a criminal conviction, probation must be completed, or if no probation was given, all fines and restitution must be resolved. The expungement procedure generally involves a petition to the court, which includes an affidavit and motion seeking the relief, which is reviewed by a judge.

After expungement, the record will not show up on an MVR. The law varies state by state, but generally a prospective employee does not have to disclose an expunged conviction when applying for a job. A person with an expunged criminal conviction can honestly answer “no” when asked if they have any previous convictions. From a legal standpoint, if a record has been expunged, it doesn’t exist.

“However, in most states, nothing prohibits you from asking about expunged records, except California and several other states,” said Alaniz. “If your state allows it, be sure to ask on the employment application if a driver has had anything expunged and, if so, what. Either the driver will admit to the expunged violations, in which case, you now know about it and can deny employment on that basis; or the driver will deny it, which is evidence that he or she lied on the employment application and you can perform due diligence in deciding whether to terminate.”

Let me know what you think.

mike.antich@bobit.com

Comments

  1. 1. Karen [ March 13, 2011 @ 11:35AM ]

    In Florida, you cannot expunge your driver's license record. Even if you are successful at sealing a DUI court and arrest record, for example, you still cannot <a href="http://www.expungerecordflorida.com/expunge-record-free-evaluation">expunge record</a> of the DUI on your license. I think the suggestion at the end of the article solves the problem in other states though, that do allow record expungement of driver records - just ask the question directly so the candidate is either forced to reveal or will lie - either of which can screen the candidate for employment.

  2. 2. Mike B. [ March 18, 2011 @ 05:16PM ]

    One other type of court situation to look out for is "Defered Judgement", this is were the state gives a driver a probationary period, typically one year. If the driver meets the requirements set forth in the Deferred Judgement there is no conviction. If they are a CDL driver, the state must show any suspension of driving privledges. Idaho and Wyoming are two states that judges have this dicression.

  3. 3. Russell [ February 15, 2012 @ 10:55AM ]

    I live in wa. state and anythingthat goes on your mvr can stay on it for 49 years as i was told by dol. My problem is I got a dui almost 7 years ago and I went deferred pros. but everything shows on my mvr, i've got a class a cdl and i've had it for 19 years and it just doesn't seem right , even though i did everything the courts asked of me that it keeps me from getting a job. What do i do, i'll be 45 this year and i've been driving since 1990, i've been unemployed since the end of oct. and starting to lose hope of getting another driving job. tell me who will hire me if i can't get it sealed, its almost 7 years old and it happened in my personal car not a truck.

  4. 4. Shaj [ November 18, 2013 @ 02:56AM ]

    Hey Russell, any luck on a new gig? I am sorta in the same situation as you.

  5. 5. Natalio [ January 26, 2014 @ 09:17PM ]

    Hello, l live in PA and l'm a CDL driver, and l got a DUI, so my questions is: What are my chances of getting my record expunged from my MVR? If not, How can l get it removed/expunged like the driver from Illinois? Thank you for your time.

  6. 6. Natalio [ January 26, 2014 @ 09:17PM ]

    Hello, l live in PA and l'm a CDL driver, and l got a DUI, so my questions is: What are my chances of getting my record expunged from my MVR? If not, How can l get it removed/expunged like the driver from Illinois? Thank you for your time.

  7. 7. Natalio [ January 26, 2014 @ 09:17PM ]

    Hello, l live in PA and l'm a CDL driver, and l got a DUI, so my questions is: What are my chances of getting my record expunged from my MVR? If not, How can l get it removed/expunged like the driver from Illinois? Thank you for your time.

  8. 8. Natalio [ January 26, 2014 @ 09:18PM ]

    Hello, l live in PA and l'm a CDL driver, and l got a DUI, so my questions is: What are my chances of getting my record expunged from my MVR? If not, How can l get it removed/expunged like the driver from Illinois? Thank you for your time.

  9. 9. Natalio [ January 26, 2014 @ 09:18PM ]

    Hello, l live in PA and l'm a CDL driver, and l got a DUI, so my questions is: What are my chances of getting my record expunged from my MVR? If not, How can l get it removed/expunged like the driver from Illinois? Thank you for your time.

  10. 10. Natalio [ January 26, 2014 @ 09:18PM ]

    Hello, l live in PA and l'm a CDL driver, and l got a DUI, so my questions is: What are my chances of getting my record expunged from my MVR? If not, How can l get it removed/expunged like the driver from Illinois? Thank you for your time.

  11. 11. Natalio [ January 26, 2014 @ 09:18PM ]

    Hello, l live in PA and l'm a CDL driver, and l got a DUI, so my questions is: What are my chances of getting my record expunged from my MVR? If not, How can l get it removed/expunged like the driver from Illinois? Thank you for your time.

  12. 12. Natalio [ January 26, 2014 @ 09:18PM ]

    Hello, l live in PA and l'm a CDL driver, and l got a DUI, so my questions is: What are my chances of getting my record expunged from my MVR? If not, How can l get it removed/expunged like the driver from Illinois? Thank you for your time.

  13. 13. wally [ February 15, 2014 @ 03:02PM ]

    It takes 10 yrs in PA,used to be seven but it was extended to 10 two years ago.

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Author Bio

Mike Antich

Editor and Associate Publisher

Mike Antich has been covering the fleet management and vehicle remarketing markets for more than 20 years. During this period, Mike has written or edited more than 4,600 articles on the subjects of fleet management, manufacturer fleet activities, the fleet leasing industry, and vehicle remarketing. He was inducted in the Fleet Hall of Fame in 2010.

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